Validating xml with

Markup encodes a description of the document's storage layout and logical structure.

This edition supersedes the previous W3C Recommendation of 16 August 2006.

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[Definition: A software module called an XML processor is used to read XML documents and provide access to their content and structure.] [Definition: It is assumed that an XML processor is doing its work on behalf of another module, called the application.] This specification describes the required behavior of an XML processor in terms of how it must read XML data and the information it must provide to the application.

XML was developed by an XML Working Group (originally known as the SGML Editorial Review Board) formed under the auspices of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in 1996.

XML is an application profile or restricted form of SGML, the Standard Generalized Markup Language [ISO 8879].

By construction, XML documents are conforming SGML documents.For the convenience of readers, an XHTML version with color-coded revision indicators is also provided; this version highlights each change due to an erratum published in the errata list for the previous edition, together with a link to the particular erratum in that list.Most of the errata in the list provide a rationale for the change.An individual who has actual knowledge of a patent which the individual believes contains Essential Claim(s) must disclose the information in accordance with section 6 of the W3C Patent Policy.1 Introduction 1.1 Origin and Goals 1.2 Terminology 2 Documents 2.1 Well-Formed XML Documents 2.2 Characters 2.3 Common Syntactic Constructs 2.4 Character Data and Markup 2.5 Comments 2.6 Processing Instructions 2.7 CDATA Sections 2.8 Prolog and Document Type Declaration 2.9 Standalone Document Declaration 2.10 White Space Handling 2.11 End-of-Line Handling 2.12 Language Identification 3 Logical Structures 3.1 Start-Tags, End-Tags, and Empty-Element Tags 3.2 Element Type Declarations 3.2.1 Element Content 3.2.2 Mixed Content 3.3 Attribute-List Declarations 3.3.1 Attribute Types 3.3.2 Attribute Defaults 3.3.3 Attribute-Value Normalization 3.4 Conditional Sections 4 Physical Structures 4.1 Character and Entity References 4.2 Entity Declarations 4.2.1 Internal Entities 4.2.2 External Entities 4.3 Parsed Entities 4.3.1 The Text Declaration 4.3.2 Well-Formed Parsed Entities 4.3.3 Character Encoding in Entities 4.4 XML Processor Treatment of Entities and References 4.4.1 Not Recognized 4.4.2 Included 4.4.3 Included If Validating 4.4.4 Forbidden 4.4.5 Included in Literal 4.4.6 Notify 4.4.7 Bypassed 4.4.8 Included as PE 4.4.9 Error 4.5 Construction of Entity Replacement Text 4.6 Predefined Entities 4.7 Notation Declarations 4.8 Document Entity 5 Conformance 5.1 Validating and Non-Validating Processors 5.2 Using XML Processors 6 Notation A References A.1 Normative References A.2 Other References B Character Classes C XML and SGML (Non-Normative) D Expansion of Entity and Character References (Non-Normative) E Deterministic Content Models (Non-Normative) F Autodetection of Character Encodings (Non-Normative) F.1 Detection Without External Encoding Information F.2 Priorities in the Presence of External Encoding Information G W3C XML Working Group (Non-Normative) H W3C XML Core Working Group (Non-Normative) I Production Notes (Non-Normative) J Suggestions for XML Names (Non-Normative) Extensible Markup Language, abbreviated XML, describes a class of data objects called XML documents and partially describes the behavior of computer programs which process them.This version of the XML specification may be distributed freely, as long as all text and legal notices remain intact.

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